Five, Six, Seven

Alternative title, “Time keeps on slippin’ slippin’ slippin’… into the future…”

Has anyone else had that darn Steve Miller Band song stuck in their heads a lot lately? Just me?

Slipping into the future feels about right. Somehow, it’s May, and tomorrow will begin the 8th week of working from home, self-isolating, sheltering in place, pick your description of choice. Not much has changed here since my post after the fourth week.

I’ve taken a few more long walks, which alternate between helping and making me all ragey at people who couldn’t possibly scootch over a bit. Nature has been tremendously helpful, the people less so. Typical.

Marry helped me identify some of the mystery produce in our new veggie delivery box. Turns out that this one was a rutabaga, which falls into the category of ‘shit I’ve never sought out before, but let’s figure out what to do with it!’ And no, we don’t normally let her on the countertops.

To shake things up a bit, and also to get out of the stretchy pants for a change, BV and I made good on our vow to try to do more cultural things. When he had to go into the office one day, he picked up some good pizza on the way home, we both donned our finest, and we ate pizza and watched an opera in the living room. The way that so many arts organizations have been putting up free content is pretty cool. And if we have no chance to get to New York anytime soon, at least we can enjoy the Met Opera’s daily stream for free.

Our friendly local kitten visited some more, and I made another focaccia bread. The yeast in the freezer is nearly gone now though, and there was still none to be found at Edeka this week, so I’ll have to put the bread trials on hold. Or get into sourdough like the rest of the world, apparently.

BV is a huge rhubarb fan, so I took a crack at this tart from the NYT. However, I didn’t have enough coconut to make the recipe’s crust. Instead, I made a Spekulatius crust, which is something I’d been wanting to try for awhile. I took a package of Spekulatius that were leftover from the holidays, crushed them up with butter, and some flour until I got a decent consistency that could be pressed into the cake pan. Then I just crossed my fingers and hoped that it would hold the custard, which it did. Fantastic!

Continuing the theme of occasionally putting on real clothes, we dressed up to go to the Biergarten: home edition, and spent more time clearing out the endless brush in the garden. I feel like it’s improving, but the bar was pretty low.

Pardon the roadworks sign there. It’s been suspiciously silent, and we nearly never walk down that street there, so I’m not entirely convinced they’re actually doing any work. Who knows.

So that’s where things stand in our little corner of Franconia. The May 1 holiday kicks off what is normally my favorite time of year here, where nearly every week or two means another public holiday in May and June. Of course we’ll still have those, and they’ll still be nice breaks from the work week, but the luster of ‘ooooh, what should we do with the long weekend?’ is missing.

They’re starting to slowly open some things up here, though more in some of other German states than in Bavaria. I guess all we can do is see how that goes and hope for the best.

And you? How are you staying sane wherever you are?

 

17/52

Week Four.

Week four of social distancing was, mercifully, a four-day workweek. Good Friday and Easter Monday are both public holidays here, and they came at a perfect time.

For the most part I’m still feeling pretty decent most days, and taking advantage of the good weather, garden, extra cooking time, and all of that. But by the end of the workday on Thursday, I was ready to pitch my headset out of the window. I don’t even like talking on the phone… and so after four weeks of spending most of the day with this stupid thing on my head, my ears were very ready for four days off.

YES I am aware that this is small potatoes, and YES I’m very happy to still have a job through all of this, and shouldn’t really complain, but my ears hurt.

As of this week Tuesday, BV is now working from home almost entirely. He may have to go in once a week if something needs organizing in person, but I’m happy to have him avoiding public transit more.

In preparation for the long weekend, he took a half day and picked up a car share so he could do a big shop. We hadn’t been to the Getränkemarkt since before Thanksgiving, so our stock of water, beer, and juice was empty. Now we’re restocked on beverages, and he also managed to pick up a few other large and unwieldy items that we usually save for car trips.

Easter weekend was mostly spent baking. I made both Samin Nosrat’s Ligurian Focaccia and Swedish Cardamom Buns because everyone knows that Jesus only rises with yeast.

Besides that, we both tackled a bit more garden work. I didn’t get back to the fence clearing project, but I did manage to completely fill our compost box with dead grass that I raked out of the most offensive places in the garden. We may need to cut the grass more often. Maybe. We put down a bit of grass seed along the fence, and in some spots in the back that had been torn up when a mystery digger was parked back there a few weeks ago.

An outdoor brunch was also necessary, and the glorious weather lasted all the way through until this morning.

Really, it seems appropriate to end the long holiday weekend with a rainy Monday afternoon/evening. Hope it does some good for that grass seed.

The social distancing regulations that were announced a few weeks ago were scheduled to go through the upcoming weekend, with schools planned to reopen after the Easter holidays on the 20th. Nothing has changed yet as far as that plan goes, so let’s see what week five brings.

Side note: was thinking about doing quick posts with links to all the what-not that I’ve been cooking these last weeks… anyone in need of some new ideas and/or interested in that? Lemme know in ze comments!

And you? How are things going wherever you are?

 

13/52

Amateur Hour Baking: A Tale of Two Strudels

It seems that many of us have taken to the kitchen more than usual in these strange, Covid quarantine days. I’ve spent an inordinate amount of time cooking, trying out new things, and cleaning up the kitchen nearly non-stop.

The first weekend in, I spent in a South Tyrol-influenced bakeathon. Like many of social media accounts, the official ST Instagram account has switched over from “come visit us!” posts to, “stay home and experience South Tyrol through pictures and food until you can come visit us at some indeterminate point of time in the future!” posts. For the best, of course, but it did lead us into the dangerous territory of too much dessert.

When this recipe for Apfelstrudel popped up in my feed, I immediately grabbed a screenshot and decided it was time to give Strudel another shot. It’s been ages since I made the peach brie variety, and making a decent Strudel is undoubtedly a life goal I aim to accomplish. To the kitchen!

I began by whipping together my dough. About halfway through, it occurred to me to check and see what I had done last time, following the Classic German Baking method. This pastry dough was completely different to that one, but as my bowl was already chock full of butter and such, I pressed on.

I had started with butter that was already quite soft, so my dough was as well. It was less kneading, more mixing, but I hoped that some time in the fridge would firm it up well enough.

While that was in the fridge, I got to work on the filling. Naturally the recommended apples for this recipe would come from South Tyrol itself, but we settled for German apples of unknown origins, because the little signs at our local Tante-Emma-Laden are less than legible. I whipped together the apples, whatever quantity of pine nuts we still had, and threw in some cranberries as raisins were nowhere to be found in the drawer.

Filling prepared, I pulled the pastry dough out of the refrigerator and got to rolling. It was… slightly firmer but it quickly became apparent that I should have mixed the butter and sugar a bit better before throwing in the other ingredients. Besides a dollop or two of butter in my rolled-out pastry, it was still entirely too soft and I soon realized that there was no way to get it any thinner while also being able to fold it over the filling.

Finally I did get it rolled out to approximately the size recommended in the recipe, 25x35cm, and started to pour on the apple mixture. A problem quickly became apparent.

After reconsulting CGB, I think there may have been a slight conversion error. All the recipes in that book recommend closer to 25×35 inches, not centimeters. But even if I hadn’t already piled my apples on, there was no way that my sticky, sticky dough was going to get that big. Not a chance. So what to do? Call it a tart!

The filling was good, and the pastry itself was quite good. Of course it was too thick for the filling where I had folded it over, but I was in general pleased with the flavor.

But I still had nearly half the filling and what to do with that? I considered a few options, but in the end, I decided that I did not want to be defeated by this damn Strudel. I could have just gone on with the CGB pastry recipe, but I did really like the buttery sugary crust of this tart, so I headed back to the internet to source a likely-sounding replacement. Happily, South Tyrol came through for me again when I found this recipe for Apple Strudel with a Shortcrust Pastry.

The amounts of sugar, butter, and flour were much more reasonable sounding, but I did also switch out the vanilla sugar for bourbon vanilla and added lemon zest as in the first recipe. I also opted to do the smart thing and whip together the (colder this time) butter and sugar before adding the other ingredients… no butter pockets today!

At the end, I had a lovely pastry dough, not a hint of stickiness. I did give it some time in the fridge again, just in case, and then got to rolling. Lo and behold, I managed to get it to a much more impressive size, with nary a hint of sticky!

I retrieved the filling from the fridge and piled it on. Wait… could it be that now I don’t have enough? It was looking a little thin, so I pulled another two apples out of the pantry and quickly chopped those up to add in. A few minutes later, it was time to wrap and roll, with BV’s assistance.

It was a fairly secure package, but it was rather large and unwieldy, so his long arms were very helpful here. Between the two of us, we got it curled onto the baking sheet and bathed in egg yolk. Another 45 minutes, and we had a house of delicious smells and  this thicc boi.

I was sorely missing a bit of vanilla ice cream or some whipped cream, but this really worked out much better on day two. I do think more filling would’ve been good as well, so I think if I used this pastry recipe again with the full amount of filling the recipe yielded originally, it would’ve been nearly perfect. Possibly immovable, but the ratio would’ve been better anyway.

Note to self: brush up on food photo skills. As you can see,the filling was a bit thin, but so was that top crust… thin and gloriously crisp and flaky. If anyone wants to give their own Apfelstrudel a try, give the link above a shot. Just try not to get distracted by all the other delicious things on that website. Ahhhhhh…. Strudel and dumplings and Vinschgauer, oh my.

For the time being though, it’s vicarious travel through food and photos. Hopefully, we can get back to South Tyrol sooner rather than later. Happy, and healthy, with any luck. Stay inside if you can. Bake stuff if you want. It helps…  or at least for me it does.

 

11/52

I Am Easily Influenced

…at least, when it comes to cake.

In one of my classes the other day (coincidentally, one that happens right before lunch), we spent a good deal of our time discussing desserts. One of them has worked there for years and thus has the corresponding encyclopedic knowledge of when everyone has a birthday AND which cake from their (or their wife’s, mom’s,  life partner’s) repertoire, should be brought in on said birthday.

During the course of this conversation, one of the other ones mentioned that every year he requests his mom and his sister to bake several cakes for his birthday. I asked if they had a specialty, and he said of course, it’s his favorite, but he only has it one time a year. What was it? Something called Apfelweinkuchen, or apple wine cake.*

I had never heard of this cake before and my interest was immediately piqued, but the conversation moved quickly on after that, so I didn’t get a chance to inquire more. But as soon as I had a minute between appointments, it was straight to the Google. There were no shortages of recipes for this cake, which seems to originate from the Hesse area of Germany (where my source was from, if I remember correctly).

The rest of the day was spent with visions of cake dancing in my head, so naturally I tweeted about it. I was already considering making it on the weekend when I was informed that bringing a cake to a planned weekend event would be fairly welcome. And so it was.

I didn’t fully document the process, but I compared a few recipes and found them all fairly similar. I followed this recipe, for those of you who can read German at least well enough to do the same… https://feedmeupbeforeyougogo.de/2018/10/07/apfelweinkuchen-rezept/

Hallo, creamy goodness.

Some recipes suggest using white wine (usually Riesling) and apple juice instead of Apple wine, but I went with Apple wine. The only other thing I did differently was leave the cake in the oven to cool overnight (also suggested in another recipe). This was mostly because it was fairly late by the time I finished the cake and I didn’t want to put it in the fridge to cool when it was still pretty warm.

Here’s the carnage about halfway through….

Mess.

None survived. I will be making this again. You should, too.

 

7/52

 

 

*I daresay even the non-German speakers could’ve worked that one out but just in case.

Amateur Hour Baking: Plätzchen Bonanza

The pre-Christmas weeks were the usual blur of finishing up classes for the year, meeting with friends at various Christmas markets in the area, and of course, baking. I wound up making no less than five sort of Plätzchen from Classic German Baking over the holiday weeks. As such, this post gets long… click on!

Continue reading

50 Recipe Challenge: Part 5/5

~41. Roasted Garlic & Sweet Potato Polenta

I was eager for more polenta after the success and ease of the mushroom recipe, but this was was not as good. The sweet potato flavor was very mild, it was somewhat fiddly to do, and would benefit from pumping up the amount of garlic. By a lot (at least in this house).

~42. Rosinenschnecken (my recap post)

~43. Creamy Garlic Mushrooms

A fast and easy recipe, if not terribly exciting. An okay side dish though.

~44. Pumpkin Cinnamon Rolls

I cannot believe I made these and ate them without a single picture. They were ridiculously good though, so I shall be making them again. The recipe calls for pumpkin puree, either canned or homemade, and my roasted Hokkaido I had in reserve did the job perfectly.

~45. Skillet Brownie with Chocolate Ganache

Look at that shine! Another hard YES, YES you should make this. I was slightly short on bitter chocolate, but had a bar of chili chocolate laying around so threw that in. The chili gave it a great little kick, plus the crunch of sea salt on top was to die for. The only flaw to this recipe was that since it’s a skillet brownie, it tied up my favorite and most-used pan for a day or two until I could get all of it out and onto another dish. Other than that, I cannot recommend it enough.

~46. Sausage Gravy

Sometimes Twitter is super useful. Like, when you ask for suggestions on what to make for your BV when he wants biscuits but doesn’t feel like Cauliflower Chowder to go with them. Thanks to the lovely Regensbloggers, who suggested that I give these two recipes a go. Definite winners (as were their biscuits, which I tried another day).

~47. Homemade Sausage Patties

Per the directions above, we just used this for the gravy rather than patties. But if I get a breakfast sausage craving, I’m going for it.

~48. Butternut Squash and Caramelized Onion Galette

I don’t know when galettes became such a big thing, but I have pinned several of them lately. It’s possible that I just started noticing them after the lovely Cafe d’Azur in Nürnberg closed, meaning that I no longer could get a galette whenever the mood struck me. However, their galettes were more along the lines of a savory crepe, not a rustic tart like this one. Either way, I’m glad I’m no longer intimidated by crusts and pastries, because I’m never going back to not making my own galettes. Make this, and toss in some crushed garlic with the squash while it’s roasting. Win.

~49. German Pumpkin Soup

If a Sausage Has Two tells you to make something, you make it. End of story.

~50. Biberle (from Classic German Baking, recap to come)

These tiny gems were part of our annual Christmas cookie baking extravaganza this year and have been so popular that they will be going into the yearly rotation. A full Amateur Hour Baking: Plätzchen Edition will be coming soon…

 

Which brings us to the end. Almost. A few more new Plätzchen were tested out this year, so like I said, there will be a recap to come.

I’m quite pleased that I did make it to 50+ new recipes tested out. I’m debating if I want to try to do the same thing next year… since it seems that every day I come across at least one new recipe that sounds interesting or like something worth trying.

Meat is still a definite weak spot for me, and if you read through all 50 entries, you may have noticed it was a lot more vegetarian and baking-focused. I’m not a huge meat eater in general so I never feel confident that I’m doing something correctly, or that it tastes how it “should” taste. If I don’t think pork roast tastes good generally, how can I know if it’s right? Riddle me that.

So next year’s project is still TBD. I was lucky enough to receive Samin Nosrat’s gorgeous Salt Fat Acid Heat for Christmas this year, so I daresay that will give me some ideas as I make my way through it over the coming days.

And you? What was your favorite new food this year? 

50 Recipe Challenge: Part 4/5

Post-dating because I’m dumb at scheduling things sometimes…

~31. Spicy Peanut Stew with Ginger and Tomato

You can see a picture of this one in the ‘Brötchen’ post below. Stews are not the most photogenic things in the world, but it was fairly tasty. We would amp up the ginger on the next attempt,, but other than that the main flaw of this stew was that it made approximately one million dishes dirty. But lots of leftovers!

~32. Garlic Naan

Further comments on this one also in the Brötchen post…

~33. Brötchen (my recap post)

~34. Franzbrötchen (my recap post)

Nothing makes you feel more like a culinary genius than making something like this semi-successfully.

~35. “I Want Chocolate Cake” Cake

We didn’t have any buttermilk so I subbed in red wine per the suggestions in the recipe. I had a bit of trouble melting the chocolate so my frosting was a bit on the grainy side, but I was fairly okay with it. This was exactly the sort of ‘eat your feelings’ recipe that paired well with the news cycle of horrors back in September (don’t the Kavanaugh hearings seems like a thousand years ago?). If only.

~36. Linzertorte (my recap post)

Thought about making this one again for Christmas but as of now I think we’re sticking to Plätzchen and Glühwein for dessert with BV’s parents come here on the 24th. That’s enough… I hope.

~37. Oven Polenta with Roasted Mushrooms and Thyme

Oven polenta makes life so much easier, and this mushroom and herb combo is a piece of cake. I also tossed in some oregano and rosemary that we had in the fridge and that was a great choice.

~38. Coconut Butternut Squash Soup

Skipped the recommended topping and was also slightly short on squash so threw in a few carrots instead. Not the most exciting soup in the world but fast and easy on a weeknight.

~39. Bremer Kürbisbrot (my recap post)

~40. Warm Butternut Squash and Chickpea Salad

The problem with a tahini dressing is that it tan and gloopy and makes this look much less appetizing than it is. A tad more color would help, but I skipped the red onions that the recipe calls for because raw red onions (and raw green onions) are my nemeses and they ruin everything. The first time I made this I threw in some shallots for color, and that worked well, but sadly I was out this time.

 

Next week, the final ten!

50 Recipe Challenge: Part 3/5

~21. Bruschetta

Leading off today’s list with one of the easiest things in the world that is incredibly delicious and I’m only slightly resentful that it took me until age 34 to bother making. Fresh, homemade bruschetta for life! And don’t skip on toasting the baguette in butter beforehand…

~22. Peaches & Tomatoes with Burrata

Speaking of fresh and easy, this was also a great choice. My only regret is that I don’t have a picture of it for this post, and that peaches are out of season so I can’t recreate it just yet.

~23. Crab Cakes with Tomatillo Mayo

Ah yes, the crab cake debacle of 2018. Before that though, I couldn’t find any tomatillos so instead used a mix of roasted green tomatoes and poblano peppers for that sauce. That was all well and good, because the crab was a bigger problem. I was struck with a craving for crab cakes on a random day off, and all I could find at our local Edeka was the mostly-fake fish sakami sticks, and tiny packages of crawfish. They did taste vaguely of crab/fish, but they weren’t ideal.

For the second attempt, I managed to find some canned crab for a slightly absurd  price of €8/tiny can in the fancy Karstadt food section. It was super wet and goopy, but with a bit of draining and a lot more of the bread crumbs/other cake filling, they were a better choice. I’m hoping that the cheaper cans that were recently sourced at our new Asian food store will improve my next round of cake improvisation!

~24. Watermelon Feta Mint Salad

Fast and easy. That is all.

~25. Peach Brie Strudel (my recap post)

~26. Flammkuchen Elsässer Art

This recipe has been one of the better things to happen to me this year. (Shout out to Christie!) It’s so much easier than I thought it was to bring a bit of the Alsace to our own kitchen, and I can’t even count how often we’ve made it. Usually I’ve stuck to the bacon and onion variety, but this picture was from a day when we went with bacon (as I still had some in the fridge),  plus mushrooms and Gruyere. Highly recommendable.

~27. Spiced Chickpeas with Crispy Pita, Yogurt & Brown Butter

You want to make this. That’s my advice to anyone reading this. And when the recipe says it serves four, believe it. That means that even though you want to eat more, and (in our case), will eat more of it very quickly, you will feel like you need someone to roll you around the house afterwards. It is FILLING. And so, so, good.

~28. Garlic Soup

I made this tonight, specifically because I get home late on Mondays, it only takes about 30 minutes to make, we had all the ingredients (besides the Vinschgauer bread) and I was short on pictures for this post. You are welcome.

~29. Apfel-Marzipan Kuchen (my recap post)

~30. Knerken (my recap post)

In fact, now that I’m thinking about it, I may take another whack at those crab cakes later this week… check back and see if I add another picture!

Next week… 31-40!

50 Recipe Challenge: Part 2/5

Who’s hungry? I’m guessing nobody (at least nobody in Germany) because the Christmas markets are officially open over here which means that all of us are slowly but steadily turning our innards into grilled meats, bits of candied fruit from Lebkuchen, while our blood transforms into Glühwein. 

Things get out of hand this time of year. But if you’re looking to cook something, maybe numbers 11-20 will stoke your imagination…

~11. Zwiebelkuchen (my recap post)

~12. Rüblitorte (my recap post)

~13. Israeli Couscous Salad

I couldn’t find Israeli couscous anywhere, and that was after I learned that it was even a thing. Yeah… never heard of it before I made this recipe. I wound up substituting orzo and this was a great quick and easy salad. Also, it makes a ton!

~14. Coconut Chickpea Curry

Another super fast and easy recipe, great on a weeknight when you want something warm! Also it paired well with an Icelandic beer.

~15. Loaded Nachos

I don’t know how the nacho train got started, but once it started it got slightly out of hand. Instead of chili beans, I opted for black beans, and stuck to just cheddar cheese because God knows Monterey Jack does not exist in Germany. It’s perfect with football, but unless you’ve got a full party coming over, be smarter than us and cut the recipe in half! Or a quarter. Or risk food coma.

~16. Orzo Pasta Salad

We made this (again with the orzo, this time as directed) a few times for summer grill parties. I really liked it, especially after pumping up all the seasonings in the dressing.

~17. Lauchtorte (my recap post)

~18. Puddingkuchen mit Rhabarber & Himbeeren

After making multiple Rhabarberkuchen from Classic German Baking*, I switched it up after seeing someone mention this cake on twitter. I made it twice, with less rhubarb and strawberries on the first bake and raspberries on the second. BV looooves rhubarb, but preferred the standard rhubarb cake, sans pudding. We both liked this one but it was a touch too sweet for his taste.

~19. Greek Feta Spinach Burgers

I don’t eat lamb so we stuck to ground beef here. Additionally we used only about a third of what the recipe calls for and it was still a ton of meat/burger for only two people. They were okay but more trouble than I’d want on a regular basis.

~20. Crazy Good Quick Garlic Noodles

As the name says, these were crazy good and quick. Perfect for a weeknight after subbing out shallots for green onions because green onions ruin everything. That’s a fact.

 

Anyone else feeling like nachos? And stay tuned for 21-30 next week! 

*Didn’t post about those as it was one of the few recipes that I had tried out before this year.